Configuring Remote Compiling

Posted by on Jul 27, 2016 in Past Stories, Tutorials

Configuring Remote Compiling

Some of us have multiple computers laying around that are doing nothing most of the time. Maybe it’s a file server that’s got an i5 in it, maybe it’s slower than your main computer. Heck it could even be a remote server sitting in a data center somewhere. The main point is you’re tired of using your computer to compile your Source Engine levels. It’d be nice to be able to offload the compile to those other machines so your workstation is free for use. Let’s get started! There are a few steps that you’ll need to do so this all works. Create an environment for multiple users to access a level’s content Configure Remote Server Create Scripts Invoking a Compile To the Remote Machine PSExec (INSECURE OVER WAN/External) RDP (Works for LAN/WAN but is slower than scripts) Telnet (INSECURE OVER WAN/External) SSH (Ideal for WAN) Here are a few things to note You’re going to have to know a small amount of networking. You have to create a bat file for each level you’re working on. Most of us only work on one level at a time anyway. This is no big deal. You CAN set up variables, but I’m not going to show you that since my current method works perfect for me. You’re going to need the remote credentials for the server you’re accessing. Remote credentials are required to send commands to ANY remote machine. If you’re using subst drives (I currently do) you cannot use those, as it won’t see them as drives and will result in a failed execute. Create an environment for multiple users to access a level’s content We need a platform where we can keep all of our custom content in sync between our workstation and our compile machine. We are going to set up the Custom Content Without Contamination environment that I’ve written about. Using a cloud sync service (DropBox, Google Drive, OneDrive) will work for both LAN and WAN environments. For this to work you have to have ALL of your project’ss content in the cloud service. Including the VMF files. There is no exception. Configure Remote Server First we need to get all the required files on our remote machine. Essentially the remote machine needs to be setup as if it were your workstation. Install Steam on the remote machine. Install the game you want to compile for, along with the SDK (if any). Install your cloud sync service on the remote computer and sync all your project files. Custom Content Without Contamination on remote server. This includes creating the GAME_dev folder with a custom gameinfo.txt mounting all the required content.  Create Remote Scripts I’m a simple man, so I use simple scripts. We are going to create 2 .bat files for the remote server. Remote Machine – Start Compile Remote Machine – Cancel Compile Store ALL of these bat files in your cloud account. I...

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Porting Content From Other Source Engine Games

Posted by on Mar 28, 2016 in Past Stories, Tutorials

Porting Content From Other Source Engine Games

Legal / Use of Community Assets Understanding the Source Engine File Structure Porting an Entire Game’s Content into Another Game Extracting Content from a Packed BSP File Porting a Single Texture Porting a Single Model Troubleshooting Ever wanted more content for your level? Well you’re in luck! Source engine has remained basically the same forever – content wise. Aside from additional features added in various updates and branches, most content is compatible with every game running on Source Engine. This means that if you want some consoles from Portal 2 in your Insurgency level, you can do that. Want some resupply lockers from TF2 in CSGO, we can do that too! Legal / Use of Community Assets Before we dive into harvesting other games and levels for their content, there is something that you need to know. Content theft is a real issue. Stealing content from other community creators is a scummy thing to do. So what is considered theft? Ripping content from community levels with out permission from the creator for release to the public. Using content created by other creators and you not giving credit for those assets. Please note that there are plenty of packs of content out there on the web for you to use. All most people ask is that you credit them for use of the content in your NON-COMMERCIAL release. Using content for commercial use (For example, making a profit) without the original creator receiving compensation. For instance I have various asset packs on my website. You can use them all you want for personal use, but if your CSGO level were to be included into an operation you will now be using them commercially, and you will need my explicit approval. If you do not get my approval your content is subject to removal and legal action can be taken against you. People have stolen content before and they have been banned as a result. http://www.pcgamer.com/counter-strike-global-offensive-weapon-skin-removed-after-dmca-takedown-notice/ https://steamcommunity.com/games/CSGO/announcements/detail/17510…. Okay, so what can you do with content? What is considered “Okay”? Porting from VALVe game to VALVe game. (CSGO <> Portal 2, CSS <> TF2, ect..) Personal use This basically means that you’re not releasing it. So if you want content from my levels, de_cruise, de_cache, or some other community level for internal / personal use. You’re basically not profiting from it. You’re not putting it on the workshop, or releasing it to the public. (Remember when you upload to the workshop you’re required to type I Understand to the terms.) Using community assets with explicit permission from the creator. Most asset creators are happy to share their work, just ask. Basically, put yourself into the asset creators shoes. That prop you’re porting could have taken hours to make, stealing it is a scummy thing to do. TL:DR, don’t be a jerk, ask for permission or make sure you’re within the terms that the creator outlines when...

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Hammer Tutorial V2 Series #25 “Hostage + Defusal Game Modes and Radar / Overviews”

Posted by on Feb 26, 2016 in Content, Past Stories, Tutorials

Hammer Tutorial V2 Series #25 “Hostage + Defusal Game Modes and Radar / Overviews”

Download: Tutorial 25 Radar Text File Template Template file for radar overviews in CSGO Version: Filetype: txt Size: 1.32 kB Download: Nvidia Normal Map Plugin for Photoshop (x64) This is a photoshop plugin that allows you to make normal maps inside of photoshop. Version: 8.55.0109.1800 Filetype: exe Size: 17.66 MB Download: Nvidia Normal Map Plugin for Photoshop (x86) This is a photoshop plugin that allows you to make normal maps inside of photoshop. Version: 8.55.0109.1800 Filetype: exe Size: 16.32 MB Direct Link to Nvidia DDS Photoshop Plugin on Nvidia’s...

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